Sunday, 13 December 2015

The Trisula and the Vajra and their Associations with Das Blitzbündel




This article should be read in connection with my previous ones on http://armanen.blogspot.co.uk/2015/05/an-esoteric-interpretation-of-das.html and http://celto-germanic.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/thundermark-found-on-ancient-germanic.html along with Runebinder's original article which drew my attention to this ancient and very enigmatic esoteric Germanic symbol-http://volkisch-runes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/this-is-one-of-many-cheap-rings.html .

My further investigations into  Das Blitzbündel have identified a definite link with the ancient Aryan symbol of the Trisula. Eugene Goblet d' Alviella defines this symbol literally as three (tri) points (sula). The Trisula is associated with the Hindu God Shiva and this is identical with the Trident of the Greek God Poseidon, the brother of Zeus, whose symbol was the Thunderbolt. Interestingly the fusion of both symbols, the Trident and the Thunderbolt gives us the Vajra, a ritual object which fuses together the qualities of the indestructability of the diamond and the irresistable force of the Thunderbolt. d' Alviella labels this object as a 'Dordj', but Vajra is the generally more accepted term. He states of this:

"Even at the present time (author writing in 1894-Wotans Krieger's edit) it can be recognised there under the form of the dordj, a small bronze instrument shaped like a double sheaf, with six or eight branches, which, held between the thumb and forefinger, is used by the lamas and bonzes to bless the faithful, and to exorcise demons."

The Vajra is referred to in the Rig Vedas as the weapon of the Thunder God Indra, made by the smith of the Gods, Tvastar. It is translated as the 'heavenly bolt of thunder' in Ralph T.H. Griffith's translation of the Rig Veda:

"He slew the Dragon lying on the mountain: his heavenly bolt of thunder Tvastar fashioned." (Book 1, Hymn XXXII)

Wendy Donniger O'Flaherty translates this passage as:

"He killed the dragon who lay upon the mountain; Tvastr fashioned the roaring thunderbolt for him."

My astute readers will notice that  Das Blitzbündel is just two forked rather than three forked as in the Trisula but it is clear that there is a definite connection between both symbols both in style and in purpose. The lightning-fork symbol can be either double-pronged or triple-pronged as illustrated in J.T. Sibley's most excellent detailed but readable The Divine Thunderbolt. Missile of the Gods (2009).

Das Blitzbündel has clear stylistic associations with not only the Vajra and Trisula but also with the Keraunoi of the Greeks and Romans. It is a type of symbol that can be found throughout the Aryan world.


1 comment:

Rayne said...

Keep investigating with your research! The world needs more people who dig deep into archeology of the books and stories.